Saturday, January 19, 2013

How do Koreans feel about the Chinese?

Dear Korean,

How do Koreans feel about Chinese people?

barbbui

(source)
Wow, a question about how 50 million people feel about 1.5 billion people? Can it get any easier than this? Writing this blog is such a walk in the park.

All kidding aside, experience has taught the Korean that he should first go over the basics of what this post is, and what this post is not. What this post will do is to provide a general overview of various attitudes that toward the Chinese that can be found in various pockets of Korea. What this post will not do is to give a prediction on how you, a Chinese person, will fare in your trip to Korea, in applying to a Korean college, in a job interview with a Korean company, or in finding a Korean guy who will like you.

(Seriously, can people just STOP with that last question? Please. The Korean begs of you. He is on his knees and rubbing his hands and everything.) 

Having said that, let's jump into this ridiculously broad question, which can only be answered in a very broad manner. Suppose we have a spectrum of attitudes, going from "extremely favorable" to "extremely negative." If one surveys all the attitudes about China and the Chinese people that exist in Korea and put them on a spectrum, the attitudes would be spread from "somewhat favorable" to "pretty negative."

(More after the jump)

Got a question or a comment for the Korean? Email away at askakorean@gmail.com.



Having said that, let us walk along the spectrum, starting with the "somewhat favorable" end. A lot of Koreans see many qualities to admire in the Chinese. Having spent its entire existence next to China, it is not lost upon Koreans that China has been the world's greatest civilization for several thousand years until the recent detour of a couple of centuries. Koreans are generally familiar with and favorable toward the Chinese classics (such as the Analects or the Romance of Three Kingdoms,) and share many of the traditional Chinese values such as Confucianism. (In fact, because the communist China has done much to distance itself from its traditions, one can make a solid case that traditional Chinese values are best preserved in Korea.) 

Along the same lines, many Koreans refer to China as "the Chinese continent," recognizing its vastness and the power derived from the vastness. Koreans who admire China and the Chinese people speak of their large-scale thinking that leads to bold, daring decisions, and the patience to implement very long term national projects, which led to China's being the leading civilization of the world for several millennia. For those Koreans, China's current success is no more than the manifestation of the world-beating potential that China has always had. 

Going down the spectrum, however, there also exists among Koreans a gut-level, mild annoyance with the Chinese. In fact, if this type of attitude is likely to be the most prevalent among rank-and-file Koreans. Despite its recent success, individual Chinese are still poorer relative to individual Koreans, and Koreans often have the vague condescension of the kind that the rich feels over the poor toward the Chinese. Even the richer Chinese people -- many of whom visit Korea for business, study and tourism -- often come across to Koreans as nouveau riche louts, loud and ill-mannered. Of course, many Koreans also sensibly remind their society that Koreans had the exact same image just 20 years ago or so. But aesthetics is not something that reason can easily persuade. So at a gut-level, many Koreans harbor a sense of mild disapproval toward the Chinese.

Then there are those who passionately dislike the Chinese. This attitude mostly stems from many Chinese actions that tend grate on Koreans' nationalistic sensibilities. One constant source of tension is the persistent scuffles involving the Chinese fishermen on the Yellow Sea. In the sea between China and Korea, Chinese fishing boats -- persistently and illegally -- cross the maritime border to fish in Korean waters. When Korean police attempts to arrest the fishing boats, the Chinese fishermen often resist wielding shovels and pickaxes to the police. Since 2007, the Chinese fishermen collectively killed two Korean police and injured more than sixty. (But it must be noted that, in October 2012, Korean police killed a Chinese fishing boat captain, who was shot at the heart by a rubber bullet.)

Another source of tension is the immigration from China. As is the case with most immigrants, immigrants from China tend to be the less sophisticated lot who works in menial jobs. Accordingly, Koreans direct all the typical complaints against immigrants toward the immigrants from China -- that they are strange, dirty, crime-prone group that threatens Korea's social order. The occasional, sensational crimes that do involve immigrants from China do not help the case. For example, last year, a Korean-Chinese immigrant Wu Yuanchun was arrested in Incheon on murder charges. Investigation revealed that Wu kidnapped a 28-year-old woman, murdered her and dismembered her body into hundreds of pieces. Koreans widely believed that Wu committed the murder for the purpose of cannibalism, in accordance with the negative stereotypes regarding the Chinese. (Korean court did not find any evidence of attempted cannibalism, and eventually sentenced Wu to life in prison.) Certainly, this does not help the image of the Chinese in the eyes of Korean people.

Got a question or a comment for the Korean? Email away at askakorean@gmail.com.

81 comments:

  1. I find it most plausible that traditional Chinese values are better preserved in Korea than in the mainland PRC. I think the bar (the title of best) is higher if one is comparing Korea to Taiwan or Hong Kong - however the ROK's larger population might be in Korea's favor even in this case.

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  3. The truth of the matter is that most Koreans have some kind of ill feelings to anyone who is not Korean, as in born and raised. Even when people are Korean-American, they're perceive as having oddities. So certainly Koreans are going to have some ill-feelings towards Chinese people because they are different. At least for the most part, the countries do get along and that's good news. I think both countries have great people, culture, language, and music, so hopefully, both will get along, without the citizens judging each other too harshly.

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    1. That's true. Although for discrimination against Korean-Americans, when it does exist, I feel it's usually a jealousy thing stemming from the whole "Korean 2.0" idea. But good news is discrimination in Korea is, very notably, decreasing very fast. Globalization, man.

      I made some friends with Chinese teachers here, and.. they enjoyed Korea very much, and think Korean men are very handsome. (Are Koreans the best looking in Asia? Where does this idea come from?) But anyway there were some fairly widespread complaints that they (Chinese) were treated slightly inferior once Koreans realize they were Chinese. Even my American-Chinese friend complained about this. Also, seems like the Korean guys are more into non-Korean girls, like Chinese, whereas Korean girls, in general, just want a Korean guy. Leads me to believe that guys are more inclined to date girls of a different race/country than girls, as girls seem to be more conservative. But that's off-topic...

      But yeah, Koreans seem to, in general, think they are at least slightly better than other people. Just simple nationalism. Even if Koreans can't beat another country in some way, they will still have to prove it to themselves. Maybe America has more money (discounting the credit debt), and maybe China is much larger, and maybe the Japanese dominated their country a bit, but they'll still taut to you that they're the best. They love when you tell them how much you like Korea. For me, it's no lie. I love Korea, except for 떡볶이, that stuff is gross. But they'll say Chinese are dirty, Japanese are evil/enjoy bananas, Americans have no manners, and Koreans are awesome because they invented Hangul, blah blah... Good news is, I'm pretty sure they're on excellent terms with Turkey (a seemingly random country). Anyway, to put a fair point to it -- Every nation, in general, does a similar thing: nationalism. It's unfortunate that marriages, too, are sometimes dictated by religion or race... But come on. Love knows no bounds. Interracial is awesome.

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  4. I find it interesting that Koreans seem to not bear any historical animosity toward China for its role in the Korean War. While some Koreans today still blame the U.S. and the USSR for dividing Korea, China gets none of the blame, it seems. After all, North Korean forces were pushed back to the Yalu (i.e. totally defeated) before China counterattacked. Nor does China seem to get a lot of Korean ill-will for propping up North Korea for all these decades.

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    1. The initial treaty signed by the American + British + Chinese in Cairo stated that they all intend to give Korea full independence by itself. However later when Japan surrendered, US and Soviet decided to split up the peninsula, to which China at the time announced that they should stick to the initial agreement and give the whole peninsula back. As for North Korea, well it's not like China could stand up against Soviet orders at the time, and had the Americans not push over the border and getting the Chinese all defensive and angry they wouldn't have joined in. In WWII they really did help us, sharing a provisional capitol with us and all, and they've made a few attempts to get us united although obviously they cared for themselves first 'cause they're in as much trouble. So I guess most of us would rather be mad at US and Soviet for the divide.

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    2. I would just like to add that the reason for China's counterattack was due to US military general Douglas MacArthur pushing the North Koreans into China's territory. Despite China's warning, MacArthur failed to heel to it. President Truman also took the effort to warn MacArthur to not pissed off the chinese. Therefore, I conclude that China should take the blame for the splitting of Korea

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    3. What I learned in Canadian history classes about the splitting was that, it is the American's fault not the Chinese. America wanted to invade China so their plan was to use Korea to get China.

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  5. Individually, Chinese are really nice people. As one big giant humongous country, they can be overbearing.

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    1. Individually, Americans are really nice people. As one big giant humongous country, they can be overbearing.

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    2. Yes, but the Americans will never tell the Koreans that their culture is merely a copy of theirs.

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    3. Are you sure about that one? Americans ARE over-bearing ignorant people. They always make fun of Canada and other countries saying things like "how is Canada even a country?" Your comment is so misinformed...
      As an American myself, I know this to be true...

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    4. And how is Korea not a copy of Chinese culture? American Ignorance at its best. Inb4 talking outta ass. instead of history class.

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    5. Well yeah Chinese can be a bit, ummm, too proud of their culture and history and that rub us in a wrong way... I mean most Koreans probably will gladly recognize that we learned a lot from being China's neighbor for thousands of years, and we definitely appreciate the heritage. It's just that you know, people get too nationalistic and that really don't work well for both sides. Some Chinese would claim that we're just "direct copies" which obviously we wouldn't enjoy; and then again there are Koreans who are too proud to be identified as Koreans and refuse to acknowledge the shared heritage and I know that rubs the Chinese people the wrong way too.

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  6. I think it's worth noting for the sake of those who not very familiar with Chinese immigration to Korea: many of them are ethnic Koreans who can speak Korean. They think things will be better since they are going from being a minority in China to being part of the vast majority in Korea. Only time will tell if they are able to find a better life in Korea - but as the Korean noted - they are generally looked down upon in Korea.

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  7. A better question is, "how do the Koreans to the north of South Korea, and those living inside China, feel about China and its people?" Besides the utterly horrifying ordeals of so many like Shin Dong-hyuk at one end of the spectrum, it's pretty hard accurately gauge the views of most of the Hermit Kingdom's inhabitants that reside in the middle.

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    1. There's a significant portion of Chinese Koreans as one of their official "many minorities". I have friends who were born in China but are ethnically Korean, and she told me that when she was very little she somewhat felt like she didn't blend in because she spoke Korean at home, but ultimately that's just her own demons, there's little to no discrimination 'cause most people don't really care. She was with me on an internship for a year in Korea, and near the end of our internship she told me that she used to think what it would be like to move to Korea, but she's seen more discrimination as a Korean Chinese in Korea than she was a Korean in China. I definitely feel for her, being a Korean American and all.

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  8. I would like to hear the answer to that question, (How do Koreans feel about Chinese people?) My father made me an American citizen at birth, because he told me that Koreans treat dogs better than half-breeds.

    After many years of listening to my mother and her Korean friends, I concluded that Koreans hate everyone. I wonder if the new generations of Korean people have less hate?

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  9. Thomas, it seems as if you know nothing of Korean history. Everyone has invaded Korea. Everyone seems to have wanted a piece of Korea (Japanese, Chinese, Manchurians, Mongolians, Western powers). What happens when everyone bullies you? You hate everyone. That's basic psychology.

    However, if you talk to them, gain their trust, learn something about them and stop talking from experiential ignorance, then maybe you wouldn't be so negative.

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    1. This is somewhat tangential, I think it's worth mulling over when one reads posts like Thomas's.

      The Korean has posted before about how some of these young people who have never experienced racial discrimination in their own communities before come to Korea, have a few negative experiences directed against them for the very first time, and in their shock and ignorance may become convinced that Koreans are the most racist, xenophobic, hate-filled people in the world. Never mind that they've probably not had much experience with other cultures for comparison.

      Well, judging from the statements made by many of the posters at a certain infamously hate-filled Korea job site, some of these people also make it their business to revile and campaign against Korea at every opportunity, even after they've long since said goodbye to the country.

      I'm not saying Thomas' father is one of these people -- maybe he has good (personal)reason to feel the way he does -- but then maybe he is. Or maybe he's been influenced by some of them.

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    2. If you look at the world history, everyone invaded everyone. We learn from the past. I am wondering if the the new generation have less hate, because they did not experience any of the wars of the past.

      Yes, I do have much experience with many cultures and lived in Europe, the Middle East, Africa, U.S., Canada, Taiwan, and many more not listed. I do visit China and Japan every now and then and I do get treated very well in those counties. Now that I think about it, I got treated very well in the all countries I visited except for Korea. It may be different now in Korea since I have not been there in over 40 years.

      Yes I do have personal reasons to feel the way I do about Koreans. I have not been back to Korea since I was 3. I know from my experiences in the past with dealing with the older Koreans that they do not treat half breeds very well. I always wonder when I was a kid why the pure Koreans did not want anything to do with half breeds. My mom told me that day I was born in Kunsan, she and I were treated very badly in Korea until we moved to the States.

      Yes it true that I roll my eyes when I hear my mother and the older Koreans talk. The young Koreans that I meet outside of Korea are very friendly and show no hate. Therefore I am wondering if the new generations of Koreans in Korea have less hate.




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    3. @Unknown,

      I wish I was talking from experiential ignorance. In a way, your response reminds me of my conversation with Omar Abdel-Rahman "The Blind Sheikh" at my college. He told me we are not terrorist, you have to understand our past.

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    4. poor whittle korea. Koreans only think about themselves and thats why their basic psychology is flawed. So is their fake faith in Evangelical Christianity.

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    5. Ah, there you are, Tiny Daniel. So very intelligent for his size. There, there...

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  10. Wasn't Wu Yuanchun Korean-Chinese?

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    1. Which did Wu Yuanchun consider himself? I have talked to ethnic Korean-Chinese nationals from Yanbian and asked them directly, "Do you consider yourself Chinese or Korean?" The answer was always "Chinese".

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    2. But how do Koreans view them? I get the impression that most Koreans would view ethnic Korean Chinese differently from ethnic Han Chinese. I find it strange that Koreans refer to ethnic Korean Chinese by their Mandarin pronunciation. Calling Chinese even by their Mandarin pronunciation is a rather recent phenomenon (e.g., most Koreans call Mao Tse-tung, "Mo Taekdong", but call Hu Jintao "Hu Jintao") and I've read articles criticizing the use of Mandarin pronunciations for ethnic Korean Chinese. I can understand why Koreans would all ethnic Han Chinese by their Mandarin names, but I don't get why they would call ethnic Koreans by their Mandarin names. Not even the ethnic Korean Go/Baduk player for the Chinese Weiqi Association, Piao Wenyao was called by his Korean pronunciation of his name, "Bak Munyo," in Korean Go articles until a few years ago.

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    3. That is because even Korea now seldom uses Chinese characters, they use that in important things to divide different words with the same pronunciation such as their names which putted in identity cards and some documents for laws.And all the characters has its method to read in Mandarin Chinese,Korean Chinese know that obviously.In fact there is no difference between Korea names and Han Chinese names.Maybe Korean Chinese use some characters which is not very usual to be used in Korea to be their names.

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  11. Also, I think it's possible to be on both sides of that spectrum. I know some Koreans who love Chinese classics, but have somewhat of a disdain for modern Chinese people.

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  12. In reading about china, I was interested to discover that before the mid 1800s, Korea happily considered itself "China's best tributary" or something like that -- being the closest friend of the greatest civilization in the world and such -- before things got weird in the late 1800s. Even in the late 1800s, Queen Min and her faction pushed for closer relations with China as Meiji Japan pushed for more influence on the peninsula. Korean Yangban read the chinese classics, some Korean thinkers were well read in china, Korean elites made trips to china and vice versa, and Korea wore the badge "most civilized of the barbarians" with pride, relative to china, and the Korean king carried a special rank that was one level below the Chinese emperor, back in Chosun times.

    These days, the most common thing I hear about China are a set of stereotypes that, because EVERY time I hear them, they come as a complete set, and they almost always come from people above a certain age, make me suspect that Koreans were taught these things at some point in the past, perhaps in one of those middle school textbooks or something. Koreans who have returned from china, who are above that certain age, frequently say "China's dirty" "Chinese food smells" and "Chinese food is greasy" and then perhaps they toss in something about the people being poor. Not everybody talks about china this way: lots of people have a smart and nuanced take -- but if stereotypes of Chinese come out, those are them. For the record, some people in every country travel with an open mind, and others from every country travel mostly to confirm their prejudices and stereotypes about other regions and groups.

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    1. After the fall of the Ming dynasty, Chosun people considered themselves to be the last remnants of Chinese civilization and called the Manchu Qing "Barbarians." I believe the Korean's stereotyping of Chinese people as having poor hygiene started way before that though.

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    2. Well we are an independent country and we have our own cultures and systems, I think it makes sense that we want to move away from being a "2nd best" role. I guess it somewhat feels like we were the little sister of China, but now we've all grown up, we want something else and China would have to see us as equals and let go of some things. I think some Chinese have a hard time adjusting their views, and some Koreans are way too aggressive going about trying to build our own identity, so that's why we see some conflicts. Just my two cents though.

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  13. Here are the common sentiments among Korean Americans IMHO:

    Chinese are fashionably tacky. Only the rich Hong Kong ones are fashionably acceptable.
    Chinese are loud... Especially on the golf course.
    Chinese are copycats and like to cut corners to make a profit.
    Their houses smell like old grease.
    They are cheap but like to gamble.
    The obsession with red is such an eyesore.
    They are smart and we are tired of them beating us in Westinghouse, Intel and Siemens competition. It also pisses us off that they get more
    gold medals. But we try to make ourselves feel better by reminding ourselves that they do have 1.5 billion people while we only have 50
    million. And we gloat that we are much better golfers. We are better looking too... Thanks to all the plastic surgery. Yes, they have Jeremy Lin and Yao Ming but we have Park Saeri and Kim Yuna. And let's not forget Psy. A big score for Koreans. But it still bothers us that the world won't recognize us as racially, culturally and economically superior.

    As for me, I noticed that Chinese can't sing. We Koreans have perfected our vocal chords through endless hours at noraebang so we are ready to rumble with them at a sing-off anywhere and anytime.

    Excuse the ipad typos.


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    1. Haha the singing part... I guiltily admit that I was seeing that as well! Our pop singers in general just sing better than their pop singers I'm sorry.

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    2. Yeah, some of them are Cantonese stereotypes, especially with the loudness, greasy smell, fondness for gambling, etc. I'm of Shanghainese descent and we often get mistaken for Koreans or sometimes Japanese.

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  14. Here are common sentiments among Chinese Americans or Chineses on Korean Americans or Native Koreans, IMHO:

    I'll give credits where credit is due.

    - Koreans are socially awkward, Chineses are too. But Chineses know that, and they tend to group with themselves. Koreans tend to break out and make a fool out of themselves in social setting.

    - Koreans are loud too. Hearing they're saying in Korean is like listening to somebody arguing over the phone. Chinese? speak loudly too. Chineses don't know the environmental setting and "whispering" is not in their dictionary.

    - Korean females tend to look prettier. Thanks to plastic surgery. Chinese female tend to look bland. Credit: There are very beautiful Koreans and very beautiful Chinese as well.

    - Koreans (male or female) have flat butt. (Don't check upon Psy and Bobby Lee. They are fat in Asian standard.) Even Daniel Henney doesn't have ass. He's very handsome though. If you want to differentiate 50 Million Koreans and 1.5 Billion Chineses without asking their names and whereabouts, go figure their butts first as a general guideline.

    - Koreans are copycats too. Hyundai? Ring a bell of Honda? Mostly from Japanese products. I could use "Cultural Exchange" between neighboring countries. But since other readers are using "copycats", why not? Starpreya Vs Starbuck? Samsung Vs iPhone? You can either claim they are modifications of existing products or copying from others. Since Korea is democratic countries, and allies with US, nothing much is media-disseminated as much as those news from China. The fact that Samsung plant in North Caroline (creating jobs in US soil), and iPhone plant in China (Outsourcing) render Americans forget about Samsung and Apple lawsuit fight.

    - Koreans need to remind everybody they come across, not only themselves that Korea is a legitimate country, their conversation starts with "In Korea, ....". Chineses don't give a tiny ass about "In China,.... " because it's already the oldest and indisputable existence that nobody needs to ask.

    - Koreans are very nice and hospitable people. Chineses lack manners in social setting.

    - Korean news don't tend to make a big hit; either good or bad. Chinese news usually make a huge hit especially bad news, thanks to every US media outlet, Times, NYPOST, WashingtonPost, HuffingtonPost, and well at least CNN.

    - Korean hates when they're told their language is modification from Mandarin, Minnan.

    - Koreans tend to gloat whenever there's some achievements originating from Korean people. Chinese? don't even bother. Ping Pong, Badminton?

    Those are posted here for some readers perusal Or food for thought, no offense intended.

    Chinese can't sing? I'll let other readers decide.

    In fact, I found there's more interaction between Chinese and Korean people at all level. Instead of picking bones with each other, we should unite and work together.

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    1. I'd like to point out one thing though - while Hyundai and Honda may sound similar, Hyundai is actually a Korean word (meaning modern/modern times), Honda is the name of the founder of the company.

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    2. Hyundai actually existed prior to Honda. Hyundai was founded in 1947, while Honda was founded in 1959. If you're going to say Hyundai copied Honda, then it's really more accurate to say that Honda copied Hyundai.

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    3. Yes for working together! Maybe I'm just being too sensitive but I think there's so much that we can achieve working as a team! Look at Europe and their union, how the western hemisphere is united, we Asian countries share so much in common yet we argue every single day, it's really sad to see. Well OK I'll be direct here the Japan problem I don't know how to resolve, how to calm down everyone in Korea and China who has a problem with it... but Korea and China has been on good terms historically for soooo long why can't we cooperate more? Unless, I guess, it's kinda like America vs Canada friendly pokes, but I do find some of the things that both sides do to each other seem to go a little overboard sometimes...

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    4. Are u crazy? Koreans copy everything. They are not original

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    5. 1) Korean guys ... well, they have bigger butts than you think. Much, much bigger than the average Chinese/American.
      2) Huang Qishan from China is one of the greatest singers in the world.
      3)

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  15. "In fact, I found there's more interaction between Chinese and Korean people at all level. Instead of picking bones with each other, we should unite and work together."
    As a Korean American, I say amen to that.

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  16. In all seriousness (i was being cheeky before if you haven't noticed), i greatly admire the Chinese. They don't have the pretentious phoniness that a lot of Koreans have. They are more humble, innocent and assertive (due to communism in which equality was prized whereas Korea has been stuck in the Confucious mentality of respecting authority and being obedient). The Chinese reminds me of how Koreans used to be 30 years ago... In a good way... Before Korea became a land of excess and wannabes.

    But neither move out of your way when you're exiting elevator or subways.
    But i agree that the chinese and koreans should work together.

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  17. I, to this day, am amazed not at Koreans dislike of China, but the relatively positive opinion they have of Chinese versus Japanese. I mean Japan did terrible things to Korea, but China did and continues to do things to them. The fishing thing is small potatoes compared to actively maintaining North Korea's government to keep the west away... Kind of a dick move from South Korea's POV.

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    1. Well the thing is, when the line is drawn, it's drawn. If China doesn't interfere with North Korea, we couldn't have taken it down with all the military supervision of the US and Soviet backing it up anyways. And the though of starting a bloody civil war is sickening to me to be honest. It's way easier for us to forgive China for helping North Korea because, well, they're still Koreans, helping Koreans who we don't necessarily agree with is way, way better than killing Koreans. And they helped us to take the peninsula back in the first place, they also tried to stop the dividing, so I guess there are bigger grudges elsewhere.

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  19. The Chinese government's continued insistence on rewriting significant part of Korean history as their own (e.g., arguing that Goguryeo was actually part of an ancient Chinese civilization) a.k.a. 동북공정 has probably been the single most significant factor in generating the Korean people's animosity towards modern China. I'm surprised that TK failed to mention this.

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    1. I agree that was an unecesary move on their part. That being said, we have something to ponder too: was it necessary for us to try to claim heritage to all aspects of our culture as if we're not even sure what we are? I think us doing that was what set off a series of arguments with China in the first place. I think it was like dragon boat or something that started it? We tried to claim the right to it and refused to co-sign with China, so they got pissed and made a rather nasty claim too...

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    2. I think the Koreans are pretty sure who they are. The question is more along the lines of, "do the Chinese even know who they are?" Majority of them relate themselves as simply "Chinese" yet undoubtedly this is in reference to the more common and dominant "Han" Chinese. It doesn't really matter what they consider of themselves, honestly, when there are 56 ethnic groups and a significant portion of them want "out." What I find amusing is the fact that only now, after thousands of years, the all mighty and proud Han Chinese would even bother to consider Goguryeo as part of Chinese heritage. Throughout ancient Chinese history, especially the ancestors of current majority Han Chinese, they never associated themselves with the so-called "barbarians" such as Koreans or Japanese. The international scholarly communities know that the current Han Chinese government had pushed that propaganda in order to prevent any possible separatist and irredentist movement from the Chosunjok in mainland China (should the two Koreas unify). The irony of current Han Chinese government's attempt to systematically assimilate minorities or even absorb Goguryeo heritage as their own is literally an act of spitting on their ancestors' faces, because their ancestors never regarded "barbarian" minorities as part of their so-called distinguished and vastly superior "zhong guo" culture and heritage.

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  20. Two Things;

    1) Koreans are more classist than racist. Not saying they don't care about race, but they will care more about class. So Chinese immigrants get a bad rep not for being from China but being immigrant laborers. If they went to Harvard and wore a Harvard Sweatshirt, I guarantee they would be treated better regardless of race.

    2) This leads me to Bi-Racial Koreans. Which in itself can be categorized as Western/Korean and Korean/SE Asian now, but I'll focus on Western/Korean (AmerAsian) kids. Yes, they were horribly treated and discriminated against. There is no excuse for this. In the past, AmerAsian kids were viewed as strictly offspring of GI Men and Korean Women. Society generally viewed a Korean woman willing to have a GI Kid as a prostitute... because many prostitutes work near US Army bases (True Around the World). Many of them wanted to marry or get prego and ensnare a GI to save them from their current situation. Thus the horrible situation was rooted into the psyche of the public.

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    1. Exactly, I am a Chinese, and often I get mistaken as a Korean. You know why? Because I dress well and maintain a good personal hygiene. Regardless of what occasion, I always look my best. I have a lot of Korean friends and they are all very nice to me.

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    2. That's is very true some people do get mistaken by that.

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  21. Good post; I liked that you have rooted some of the perceptions Koreans have for Chinese based not just on recent events, but also on history and shared cultural values.

    I'd like to ask you or anyone else who has insight into this: What about Chinese Americans, or just Asian Americans? I ask because I'm curious which part is dominant: Are you considered American or Chinese, or maybe a blend of both?

    For example, Japan has very different perceptions of both Americans and the Chinese. As a Chinese American who has lived in Tokyo for a number of years, I have never been treated as Chinese, but as American. So I am curious as to how that works out in Korea.

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  22. @rakshas

    Like in any civilized nation; you will be treated accordingly to each individual situation.

    Not sure exactly since I can't imagine how anyone is supposed to know you are Chinese American vs. Taiwanese vs. Singaporean on the street or in a store.

    How about a more specific question or situation?

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  23. As others have noted...I'm surprised that China's Northeast Project and their unconditional support of North Korea isn't mentioned by The Korean. China's outrageous attempt at appropriating Goguryeo (one of Korea's Three Kingdoms) as a Chinese kingdom via the Northeast Project created more visceral hatred and disdain for China among South Koreans than any other event in the last 20 years. This alone was enough to demote China from being one of the most favored countries among South Koreans to being the least favorable according to polls. Many Koreans felt that the Northeast Project was nothing more than a blatant attempt at creating a causa belli to invade and occupy North Korea in the event of war by claiming the region to be historically Chinese (Goguryeo's borders were within present day North Korea and Manchuria).

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  24. "A lot of Koreans see many qualities to admire in the Chinese" lol Seriously? this article is total joke. I've lived in Korea for over decades so I know how they think about Chinese.
    Koreans have a lot of negative stereotypes about Chinese.
    They could be "They are dirty, they don't take showers often, they are selfish as hell, their fashion (which includes make ups, clothing, and others) is so old, and lastly they are so loud."
    Yes maybe North Koreans see many qualities to admire in the Chinese but not South Koreans.
    Because they use the term "Chinese" when they are making fun of other people.
    For example, "Dude, you look like Chinese today" that means "you look so bad today." enough said.

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    Replies
    1. Stereotypes about Koreans from China: Undergone some form of plastic surgery, guys look and dress gay, guys are sometimes more feminine than woman when it comes to aesthetics, liars who love to claim historical figures as their own (li bai, cao cao, Confucius), and don't get me started about those kimchi whores from your country who love to seduce the westerners as a way to feed their pitiful ego, kimchi whores who spend every cent on a brand name bag at the expense of say, food, dominant male figures who are abusive to woman ETC.
      I'm sorry but if you're gonna be close minded then I just want you to know some negative perspectives of Chinese on Koreans.
      In all honestly, there's racism towards another country everywhere. One should just laugh at it, understand its apparent, but never judge individuals based on a stereotype, because that it THE most pathetic and ignorant things someone can do. However, closed minded people like you exist, unfortunately - making Korean citizens seem like such a conceited and mentally behind country. How shameful.
      If you've actually tried to befriend a decent Chinese person, you will know those stereotypes are far from true, but sad to say...clearly you have yet to come out of your small world, filled with discriminating myths propagated by others similar to your kind.
      Please note also, those stereotypes are also illustrated to you by the worst of the worst in the Chinese society, even the Chinese nation sees it as unacceptable behavior.
      Closed minded people are seriously suffocating to society, please just continue thinking the way you do, you'll never amount to anything important in society anyway.
      My apologies for being harsh, but your post made me cringe a little.

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    2. Ok, "there are close-minded people like you blahblahblah" aside, what is with these hordes of Chinese claiming that the Koreans claim Chinese historical figures like Confucius as their own?????? What the hell are they teaching in Chinese schools, some fake accusations? What losers. Go to Korea, ask any people, be they students, street venders, people in their sixties and all- like ALL- will say Confucius, and many other Chinese historical figures that the Chinese are hallucinating themselves into believing that the Koreans are claiming them ARE Chinese. Tsktsk. BECAUSE they've been taught about these CHINESE historical figures at schools.
      Your comment not only reflects just as much close-minded Chinese tendencies as in the comment you replied to, in addition to their pathetic beliefs that the Koreans claim you Chinese's historical figure as their own. I'm seeing these hallucinated Chinese both offline and online. Why do you people do that?

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    3. What do Koreans learn in school? That Americans are their for their own good? LOL real koreans with national identity and a backbone have no foreign military rapeing their women on their own soil.

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    4. To Jo --- Our government has tried to claim the right to several cultural related heritage to world organizations, I really don't think Confucius is one of them because that is ridiculous, but some other things though. And that set people off in a wrong way. Many Koreans have protested about it, it just seemed like a bad move that will anger our neighbors and make them feel like we're trying to steal something from them, but it is what it is.

      To Karen --- I can attest to you that DEFINITELY not every Korean is thinking that way, we'll laugh at someone if they told us that Cao Cao from three kingdoms is Korean. On the other hand, if someone is so desperate to try to draw that conclusion, it's certainly because a lot of us enjoyed these Chinese classics and that should be a GOOD thing as long as no one's making a bad move, our shared values and history and heritage should be a bond that strengthens us, not tear us apart...

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  25. For Chinese, "Hey, you look like Koreans today" means "Your look seems cut and bristled or undergone surgery." Enough said. Look at the douchebag horse dancing in front of the newly elected female President. They don't know the integrity and vogue.

    China has many talented chinese people all over the world. Count the number of Chinese professors in US. Count the number of Nobel laureates in Physiology and Medicine given to Chinese Americans in US.

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    Replies
    1. Everything multiplies when "China" is in the equation. It's not surprising there are way more talented Chinese than anybody else. Actually, it will be very weird if that wasn't the case. Just look at the pure number of the population.

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    2. I don’t think that’s it ..Chinese youth tend to be emotional about issues related to the Korea

      Delete
  26. Actually, Hong Kong is Hong Kong. I am a Hong Konger there all my life. Although, some Koreans say our people are rubbish but I don't care because I love Korea after Thailand.
    Please don't say Hong Kong is part of China Territory because we are disagree, so That's why I leave Hong Kong for Korea, Thailand even Canada.

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    Replies
    1. I spent years in Hong Kong and traveled to Korea and Mainland China.I noticed the face structure of HK people are similar with Taiwanese.Girls in both areas are beautiful. However, Mainlanders looked like Koreans.Their faces were rubber-like.Eyes were slanted and narrow with single lid.I wonder whether these Korean and Chinese aspects came from northern nomads such as Mongolians and Manchulians. On the other hand Honkong people and Taiwanese came from Shouth China.They have double lid eyes like al,omd shape.They were refugees of Ming dynacity. They still maintain Chinese tradition well. Nomad sucks.

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    2. Korean are a subgroup of Northern Chinese Nomads. Not the other way around. The Southern Chinese are annexed by the Tang

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    3. TOOOOOOOOOOO bad hong kong ruled by china. You mad?

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    4. Sorry, I am from Hong Kong. Most people in Hong Kong are proud to be a Chinese. Just some teenagers/youngster do not agree.

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    5. my family are from hong kong but i was born and raised in a western country. i've been questioning this for a long time now; when asked about my ethnicity, should i say that i'm 'hong kongian' or 'chinese'? i used to not like calling myself 'chinese' (i was young and naive) but then i couldn't be bothered to argue when people say "oh so you're actually chinese because hong kong is part of china," so now i just go with being 'chinese'. but now i've seen your comment, i was wondering what i should label myself as?

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    6. If anybody in Hong Kong know the history of themselves, they would not say they are hong kongers but chinese

      Delete
  27. The Wu Yuanchun case took place in Suwon, not Incheon.

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  28. The Han race brought civilization to you inferior Koreans. You are the dirty race. We are the superior race. Glory to the Han race.

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    Replies
    1. That is pathetic trolling. As a proud Chinese, you're an embarrassment if you really are Chinese. I respect Koreans not insects like you. I have doubts you're even Chinese.

      Delete
    2. Hey, mao pai, are you Chinese? i feel shame for you as a Chinese. If you want respect from others, you should be respectful first.

      Delete
  29. I'm a South Korean. Let me talk about this issue fairly.

    - Before year 2000: S. Koreans didn't such think about China concretely, just had a simple and slight negative images because China helps North Korea to be letting Korean peninsular keeping broken for a long time. But was not such a serious negativeness of China.

    - Year 2000: Chinese government were starting to make one of Korean kingdom 고구려(Ko-Gu-Rea ; 高句麗) to be a part of Chinese Kingdom suddenly which was an originally one of the ancient Ko-Rea(고려;高麗) where were placed northern side of Korean peninsular though.
    Then immediately all the S. Koreans got shocked seriously on Chinese people and Chinese government. And at that time Koreans had seriously got negative images about China unfortunately. This was a critical problem since that time.

    - After year 2000: However at the same time, Chinese people have loved Korean culture due to Chinese Cultural Opening government policy, and Chinese government didn't try to occur the historical problem anymore though it's not quite completed, so Koreans have had positive mind toward Chinese people.

    However also at the same time, till now lots of massive Chinese fishing vessels have been invading Korean west coast frequently, how could Koreans don't have annoying thoughts about Chinese people even such as Chinese fishing man killed Korean coastguard police officer crime was occurred.

    But fortunately many Chinese tourists have visited S. Korea and concurrently are loving Korean cultures , and advanced diplomatic relationships with S. Korean government and.. moreover a same stance toward a brutal Japanese extreme rightists and national policy with Korea. so these make Korean people feels the same feeling of solidarity wih China now.

    So let me say in a word.

    Koreans are feeling about China is totally complex as upon various people but continuously have been advancing positively now.

    I also had not such bad thoughts about China before, and wanna a good relationships with China continuously. I just explained overall general S.Korean people's thoughts and its changes : )

    Korean people are usually quite sensitive about the historical issues because of lots of harmed historical incidents.

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    Replies
    1. Are you sure Chinese government really make one of Korean kingdom to be part of Chinese Kingdom?

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  30. In terms of Asian Americans, I feel the relationship between Korean Americans and Chinese Americans could be better. I notice both tend to stick with their respective racial groups and use English to communicate.

    From my view as a Chinese American:

    -There are many Chinese American girls who appreciate Korean pop culture. Korean Americans find this weird.

    -There are many Chinese American girls who find Korean Americans good looking.

    -Chinese Americans and Korean Americans appreciate each other's food.

    -The grandparents tend to be more old fashioned and reserved.

    -Chinese Americans are viewed as cheap and thrifty. Some of them only want to make a lot of money :(

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  31. I'm korean
    The answer no interesting china and japan almost korean interest out of asia

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  32. I am Korean-American and married to a Chinese-American. I can tell you right now that Koreans living in Korea are just being nationalistic towards anyone not them, including Koreans that lived in a different country...like Korean-Chinese. Even when I live in Korea, I'm not "one of them" since I grew up in the states and act "strange" and "rude" with my American manners (Korean manners are very strict). At the same time, they often seem wary of me and not sure how to peg me into a hole...untrustworthy, different, unique. I, for example, love Japan. I have lots of Japanese friends ....in fact, all my friends are Japanese or Chinese or American. When I express my love of Japan to my relatives in Korea, they are quick to disapprove.

    In America, I was subject to racism from White people, so I'm pretty used to it already. I find it funny that people complain about racism when visiting another country over the smallest of things, just because they're not used to it and have a thick hide like I do...then blame that entire country for being racist. Let's face it folks. Every country has racism. Accept it and move on.

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  33. To continue, I remember growing up in America finding myself loving Chinese food. My Korean parents thought I was strange because of that. Wow, really? lols. To them, Chinese food was strange and weird, because they weren't used to it (they grew up in Korea). Well, I grew up in America, was I was exposed to so many different types of food. Italian, American, Chinese, Japanese..........the gamut.

    Growing up in a very diverse society, I too became very diverse and accepting of many different cultures. I had black, white, Mexican, Canadian, Indian, French, Japanese, Chinese friends throughout high school. As I studied together and worked on projects with them for four years through H.S., I grew to truly love this diversity. In fact, I feel weird living in Korea right now where everyone is 99.9% Asian. Very strange feeling. You will never get to see just how exciting and fun it is to be friends with someone of a different culture than yours unless you try it out. I feel America's diversity is a very high positive for innovation and ideas.

    I find this narrow-minded-ness in Korea understandable. They grew up in a country that is 99% Korean, so anyone that is different is probably an easy target to be made fun of. Like I said, hell though if I'm Korean-American, I am treated differently when I go back to visit. Yes, I speak fluent Korean. Doesn't matter - I am discriminated. When I speak English, I'm apparently "showing off", which is strange considering I'm American speaking my own language.

    In America, I'm always asked by people (usually White), "Where are you from?" Hehe. When I explain, "I'm from Texas," then they say, "NO....I mean where are you REALLY from? Japanese? Chinese? Korean?" This is just funny to me. I may look Asian, but I can promise you, I am totally a White on the inside. I grew up in America, eating American foods, going to American schools, making American friends. I am no different, but I'm treated differently. So used to this that when I hear White people complaining about some small "racist" comment they experienced while traveling overseas, it's actually quite comical. I guess they're not used to racism yet.

    In any case, I am married to a Chinese-American and I remember my Korean cousins not liking it. They were quick to dismiss my then-fiance, saying "Why would you marry Chinese when you could marry a Korean?" Same thing happened to my other Korean-American friend who married a Japanese-American. My friend also had problems with their Korean relatives, "Why Japanese when you could marry Korean?" Personally, I think this issue is from the Koreans' lack of diversity in their country. If they lived in a more diverse place like America, I'm sure they would've been more understanding. What they don't know, they probably fear, and base their judgements on popular stereotypes.

    Luckily for all of us, the internet has brought us a means of communicating between different cultures without having to travel there. I think with the internet, people will become more appreciative of other cultures and more aware of racism. Perhaps one day, we can get rid of racism all together, and just recognize each other as one race - human being.

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  34. And just to add (I'm a Korean-American female), I always thought that Chinese women were the most beautiful women in the world. My 100% Korean dad thought so also. I still do think that. I tell my Chinese girl friend that she is so beautiful, all the time I see her. How sexy she is (I'm straight, btw). I just love their almond shaped eyes and their facial bone structure. Also, being married to a Chinese-American man, and he is very sweet. I really think Chinese guys are hot, and the sweetest. Even though I'm Korean, I never preferred to date Korean men, because the ones I did meet were kind of "interesting". They were doctors and lawyers and other highly powerful positions, but they were trying to cheat on their wives with me, asking me to call them "Oppa" and such. Wow. They were also chain smoking and drinking a lot and hitting on me, even though I told them I was already married...they dismissed entirely what I said. The other times I was exposed to Korean guys was also very negative. He was marrying and they were dress shopping for his wife (his wife was there), and he was hitting on me while she went to change. Seriously? Wow. Low morals there, buddy.

    ReplyDelete

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